NPR Music

This is one of the sweetest, funniest and most endearing Tiny Desk performances I've seen. From the moment they began playing, it was clear best friends Lucy Niles and Josée Caron, who perform as the Canadian rock band Partner, were there to leave their mark and have a whole lot of fun doing it.

Beginning at noon ET on Friday, May 18, watch Tanya Donelly's Belly and UK rock act Editors perform live at the Non-Comm radio conference in Philadelphia. The show streams via VuHaus from World Cafe Live in Philadelphia.

FRIDAY MAY 18

12:00-12:25 p.m. – Belly

12:30-1:00 p.m. – Editors

All Songs Considered's Robin Hilton chats with NPR Music's Rodney Carmichael, Marissa Lorusso, Ann Powers and Stephen Thompson for a sprint through six noteworthy albums out May 18. This includes the raging rock of Courtney Barnett, Atlanta rapper Nick Grant, wildly ambitious psych-folk from Ray La Montagne and a whole lot more.

Parquet Courts' fifth album, Wide Awake! is a turning point for the band. The four guys based in New York made conscious attempts to push their music out of their habitual tendencies toward aggressive rock and wound up with their most interesting record to date, with the help of producer Brian Burton (Danger Mouse).

Beginning at 7 p.m. ET on Thursday, May 17, watch The Record Company, Hop Along, Sweet Spirit and more perform during the Thursday night of public radio's NON-COMMvention 2018. The show streams live via VuHaus from World Cafe Live in Philadelphia.

Ray LaMontagne's music ought to be easy to pin down: He is, after all, a prolifically bearded, reclusive type with an acoustic guitar and an approachable voice. His music even dredges up familiar roots-music signifiers, from The Band-style ramblers to softly rendered ballads that recall Iron and Wine's Sam Beam.

Beginning at 12 p.m. ET on Thursday, May 17, watch Brandi Carlile and Jade Bird perform live at public radio's Non-Comm conference. The show streams live via VuHaus from World Cafe Live in Philadelphia.

Thursday, May 17

12:00-12:25 p.m. ET – Jade Bird

12:30-1:00 p.m. ET – Brandi Carlile

In this session, we have some serious musicians who trained at a conservatory and make carefully arranged music with tricky harmonies. Sound like a recipe for fun? It is. This is Lake Street Dive we're talking about, and if you've heard any of the original music they make, you know they take all the most fun bits of pop, soul, disco, jazz, rock and roll and stitch them together into something all their own.

Beginning at 7 p.m. ET on Wednesday, May 16, watch Natalie Prass, Low Cut Connie, Mt. Joy and more perform during night two of public radio's NON-COMMvention 2018. The show streams live via VuHaus from World Cafe Live in Philadelphia.

Find Wednesday evening's full schedule below; all set times are shown in Eastern Time and are subject to change.

WEDNESDAY MAY 16

7:oo p.m. - 7:25 p.m.– Ricky Hell & The Voidboys

Beginning at 12 noon ET on Wednesday, May 16, watch Titus Andronicus and Courtney Barnett perform during the first Free At Noon Concert of public radio's NON-COMMvention 2018. The show streams live via VuHaus from World Cafe Live in Philadelphia. Find set times below, shown in Eastern Time and are subject to change.

WEDESDAY MAY 16

12:00 p.m. - 12:25 p.m. – Titus Andronicus

Last week, we asked listeners to tell us about the songs that got them through school. As the stories poured in, we began to see some clear and common themes. For starters, school, while being an exciting time of profound change, is really hard. Many told us stories of battling depression, anxiety and issues of sexual identity, all while navigating a churning sea of uncertainty.

Beginning at 7 p.m. ET on Tuesday, May 15, watch Phoebe Bridgers, Gang Of Youths, Rayland Baxter and more perform during the first night of public radio's NON-COMMvention 2018. The show streams live via VuHaus from World Cafe Live in Philadelphia.

Find Tuesday evening's full schedule below; all set times are shown in Eastern Standard Time and are subject to change.

Caroline Rose has arrived. I know this sounds a little unusual to say considering her new record LONER is her third studio album. But for a point of reference, if you listen to a moment of "Red Bikini Waltz" from her 2014 album, I Will Not Be Afraid, to her new album, LONER ... Yeah, it's a little different. But this is who Rose is.

Odetta Hartman's songs have a way of spraying ideas in every direction. Sometimes, they don't even feel like songs so much as fragments, interludes or brief, fleeting brainstorms — blurted phrases set against chopped-up bits of violin, banjo, samples and effects.

The Weather Station On Mountain Stage

May 11, 2018

Hailing from Toronto, Canada, Tamara Lindeman is the principal force behind The Weather Station, known for pairing her narrative songwriting skills with topical matters and subtle reflections of everyday life.

Accompanied by William Kidman on guitar and keys, Ben Whiteley on bass, and Ian Kehoe on drums, The Weather Station's sound can easily trace back to Joni Mitchell — but Lindeman is her own artist, with a distinct viewpoint and ability to weave a powerful story from it.

Frightened Rabbit singer Scott Hutchison, whose bleak but often triumphantly arranged rock songs tackled depression, anxiety and self-doubt, was found dead at Port Edgar near South Queensberry, Scotland, around 8:30 p.m. local time on Thursday, Edinburgh Police confirmed in a statement provided to NPR. He was 36.

A very pregnant Abigail Washburn points to Bela Fleck at the Tiny Desk and says "and just so you know, this is his fault." I won't spoil the video by telling you his response.

All Songs Considered's Robin Hilton takes a quick run through May 11's essential album releases with NPR Music's Felix Contreras, Jewly Hight, Tom Huizenga, Lyndsey McKenna and Stephen Thompson. Featured albums include the irresistible pop of Charlie Puth, classical pianist Simone Dinnerstein, early folk recordings from The Grateful Dead's Jerry Garcia, infectious guitar rock from Illuminati Hotties and more.

Branding experts might tell you that an ideal elevator pitch should take 20 to 30 seconds. Our guest Dr. Demento requires only five words: "Mad music and crazy comedy." That's how he describes the legendary Dr. Demento Show, which gave a radio home to songs like "Fish Heads," "Dead Puppies," "Pencil Neck Geek" and "Shaving Cream" for the better part of four decades.

Across five albums of piano-driven rock and soul, Low Cut Connie has proven masterfully fluent in the foundational languages of Western pop, living at the crossroads where the church house meets the roadhouse, or where the Dew Drop Inn meets CBGB.

In the assorted realms of indie rock, Mary Lattimore is the monarch of instrumental harp.

On the day we talked to him, Joshua Hedley came into the studio with a cold; he was all apologies and sniffles, a cough chasing his hello. Yet when the longtime Nashville favorite entered the recording booth, a seeming miracle occurred. His trademark tenor emerged clean, warm, and on point, rounding out each note beautifully within his classic country songs.

The band's name — The Dreebs — sounds like urban-dwelling forest trolls, slipping in and out of sewers and city-sanctioned parks in packs.

Violinist and vocalist Adam Markiewicz, guitarist Jordan Bernstein and drummer Shannon Sigley have all played in the equally twisted PC Worship, and were all, at some point, part of a commune-like space called Le Wallet that's fostered many musicians in the New York scene. After a few records and digital releases, Forest of a Crew mutates The Dreebs into a strange and beautiful creature.

New phases are the unseen forces of life. In persons, in movements, they are the quietly unfolding moments and soul detritus that build momentum over time, only revealed as a crescent of new being. That's the poetry of a new moon, a solar body that exists, but is invisible to the unaided eye, and only rarely illuminated by an eclipse.

Imagine you're at a party with your most favorite music geek friends. The conversations range from favorite new albums, and favorite Smiths or Belle and Sebastian B-sides to best Neil Young guitar solos and Drake features. Then comes the big one: What was the greatest year in music? That's a question that we discuss and debate regularly in the World Cafe offices.

Back in 2016, Irish singer-songwriter Naomi Hamilton — a.k.a. Jealous of the Birds — was one of NPR Music's favorite SXSW discoveries. Her song "Goji Berry Sunset" demonstrated a remarkable gift for converting spare and common ingredients (voice, acoustic guitar, a bit of whistling) into a sound that's dense, gently hypnotic and utterly her own.

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